Botany 485 Project - Fall, 2000 - Ryan Kesler directed by Hugh Wilson

This is the initial step in a series of projects that will identify unusual elements of the Lick Creek Park flora and place them in a context, using GPS technology, that will allow others to locate the plant or specific site.  Expansion of this list, in terms of species and data, could be a target for future BOTN 485 projects.  Merger of this type of survey data with the web-based mapping system developed by BOTN 485 student Justin Custer will proceed as time permits.


Big Tree Survey of Lick Creek Park

Tree Selection

     When I began this survey I has to decide just how big a tree must be to make it on the list.  This wasnít as easy as it first seems because I wanted the trees on the list to be impressive to the untrained observer while at the same time include some species that simply do not grow as big as others. I solved this problem by deciding that a tree can make the list by meeting one or both of two criteria.  The tree must either be in my opinion an overall BIG tree. By this I mean it must stand out amongst the rest of the trees in the park. This explains why there are so many water oaks on the list. The other criterion was that the tree could be a large individual for its species. This explains why you find some trees with measurements of 30 inches. I surveyed countless trees and came up with a list of 36 that I felt were standouts in the park. I think that after it is all said and done the list I have compiled will serve my initial purpose of documenting the biggest trees in the park.

Procedures

     My study area consisted of the entire park but was focused on the bottom land woods located along Lick Creek on the western half of the park. I concentrated on this area because after a preliminary survey it was obvious that this is where all of the larger specimens were found. I used a map and divided park up into smaller sections. Each week when I went out I would concentrate on one of these sections. I would look for the bigger trees by looking for trees that stood above the canopy. This technique worked well for the larger trees. I would look for the smaller species while between the larger ones. I feel that by using these methods I covered the majority of the park, and missed as few trees as possible.

     All of the treesí circumferences were measured at breast height (4 ft. from ground), and all woody vines were measured as close to their base as possible.  I chose these heights because breast height is the standard that the U.S Forest Service, and the Texas Big Tree Survey use. I chose the base of the vines because it seemed the only part of the vine that remained constant on all vines.

 
 
Waypoint
Species
Trunk Circumference (in)
Lat.
Lon.
Discription/Notes 
001
Water Oak
74
30.56155 N
96.21233 W
Near main trail just past the pipelie cut through
002
Willow Oak
83
30.56136 N
96.21212 W
Long straight trunk first branch at 30 ft.
003
Water Oak
79
30.56123 N
96.21227 W
Long trunk with no striping, surrounded by yaupon.
004
Honey Locust
30
30.56168 N
96.21173 W
right off of path, easy to find
005
Post Oak
79
30.56118 N
96.21229 W
Found at the enterance of Copperhead Trail, surrounded by American Beauty berry and Yaupon
006
Willow Oak
117
30.56282 N
96.21655 W
50 ft. from pipeline right of way
007
American Elm
120
30.56259 N
96.21693 W
Bottomland
008
Sycamore
72
30.56128 N
96.21460 W
One edge of smaller creek (not Lick Creek)
009
Water Oak
124
30.56054 N
96.21609 W
Tree has huge trunk for 10 ft. up and then shrinks to a much smaller size
010
Water Oak
158
30.55967 N
96.21.658 W
This is a huge tree over all !! Maintains huge deiameter for most of the height of the tree.
011
Sycamore
86
30.55904 N
96.21635 W
This tree is on the far edge of Lick Creek, half of the roots are exposed. It may not make it throug the next major flood.
012
River Birch
71
30.56072 N
96.21429 W
This tree is on the edge of the creek.
013
Hackberry
75
30.56074 N
96.21431 W
 
014
Willow Oak
99
30.56028 N
96.21339 W
Right near the trail
015
Water Oak
148
30.56003 N
96.21551 W
verry tall, Huge amount of Biomass
016
Grape Vine
8
30.56005 N
96.21552 W
Craping up an elm tree on the edge of the creek
017
Grape Vine
6
30.55967 N
96.21571 W
 
018
Winged Elm
62
30.58927 N
96.21560 W
 
019
Willow Oak
108
30.55834 N
96.21670 W
On west edge of property 100 yards from Lick Creek
020
Water Oak
164
30.55833 N
96.21668 W
West side of creek 50 yards
021
Water Oak
128
30.55833 N
96.21668 W
Big tree, branch at 3ft.
022
Water Oak
140
30.56133 N
96.20895 W
Tree isn't as big as measurement suggest, trunk splits at measuring point.
023
Willow Oak
96
30.56098 N
96.20892 W
Good size for a willow oak
024
Water Oak
116
30.56080 N
96.20911 W
Trunk Splits
025
Ratan Vine
8
30.56080 N
96.20905 W
Dormant, may be dead
026
Water Oak
99
30.56009 N
96.20793 W
 
027
Elm
30
30.56009 N
96.20793 W
Dormant can't tell species
028
Hackberry
49
30.55999 N
96.20763 W
 
029
Winged Elm
45
30.55999 N
96.20763 W
 
030
Hackberry
63
30.56005 N
96.20735 W
 
031
American Elm
110
30.56019 N
96.20728 W
 
032
Oak
86
30.56018 N
96.0736 W
Dormant, some kind of oak.
033
American Elm
128
30.56042 N
96.20733 W
 
034
Hackberry
72
30.56062 N
96.20728 W
Big Hackberry
           

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