by: Katie Kam

 

Thanks for traveling here! This web site is a culmination of 8 weeks of a Botany 485 project for Dr. Jim Manhart of the Texas A&M Botany Department. Below you will link to images of the littlest parts of flowers such as the stamens, achenes, and florets that range in size from less than 1mm to over 2cm. The project involved dissecting the flower (sometimes hard to do for the flower was so beautiful), examining the parts, photographing the parts with a 35mm camera, loading the slides on to the computer through Adobe Photoshop, making a database of the flowers and then creating the web page. These are only a fraction of the flowers photographed- Dr. Manhart and others have almost 3000 images on a web site for educational and classification purposes, which is worth a visit.

As for myself, I am graduating with honors this August with a Biology major and Chemistry and English minor. I intend to continue my studies into graduate school with a masters degree in community and regional planning. This field of study combines ecology, human psychology, architecture, economics and political science for the purpose of making our cities and environment better for humans and other living organisms. Many theories exist pertaining to how humans should structure and change the land and city. Much criticism is geared towards suburbia with its rows of cookie-cutter houses and strip malls. I agree with the criticisms. Currently, people live their lives in a fenced -in house with a daily ritual of driving to work and doing weekend shopping for material goods, many of which are unnecessary. Children and teens grow up believing that making money is for the purpose of purchasing stuff at the mall or investing in a car that would not really be needed if communities were planned correctly. Traffic jams contradict man's belief that they are rational beings, for both environmental, time and planning reasons. The root of these problems lies in unimaginative, destructive development of the environment. How many have actually been to a unique city? All towns and cities contain a mall or two, a number of fast-food restaurants, several areas of defined suburbia, a concrete-ridden downtown and miles of expansive, and usually choked, highways. I've lived in Austin for fourteen years and have gradually seen it converted from a beautiful hill-country city to an ugly city of shopping centers, 4 story -high highways, and traffic. In fact, last week I saw a brown haze hovering over Austin, like Dallas or LA would have. As a student of planning, I want to: bring nature back to the city so it will be respected as a living being and not a peice of "undeveloped" land, encourage "community" in planning by creating other activities to do other than shopping, such as community gardens, parks, mountain biking and hiking trails, libraries, nature centers, and musuems, and bring logic back to planning, to where grocery stores are within a walking distance and where there are not 5 movie theatres within a one mile radius ( as the case is in Austin). Of course, people will worry about how such changes might hurt the economy, so I will research and prove that sustainable communities, as they are sometimes called, actually create a better economy for they consider aesthetics, ecology and future generations. If planning reduces the need for a car, then people will have more money to invest in global travel, education, non-profit organizations and their children. With graduate work, I want to go beyond identifying the problems, and actually start changing the morphology of our cities.

The Flowers

Scientific Name

Family

Description

Location

Status

Anisacanthus wrightii

Acanthaceae

Stamens and gynoecium

 

Cultivated

Asclepias oenotheroides

Asclepiadaceae

Longitudinal Section of flower

Wellborn, TX

Native

Asclepias viridis

Asclepiadaceae

Longitudinal section of flower

Wellborn, TX

Native

 

Boltonia diffusa

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native 

Bradburia hirta

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native 

Bradburia hirta

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native 

Chaetopappa asteroides

Asteraceae

Head parts

Wellborn, TX

Native

Chaetopappa asteroides

Asteraceae

Head

Wellborn, TX

Native

Coreopsis basalis

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native

Coreopsis tinctoria

Asteraceae

Longitudinal Section of head

College Station,TX

Native

Coreopsis tinctoria

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native

Echinacea purpurea

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

 

Cultivated

Echinacea purpurea

Asteraceae

Head parts

 

Cultivated

Eupatorium serotinum

 

Asteraceae

Head parts and longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native 

Eupatorium serotinum

 

Asteraceae

Head parts and longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native 

Gaillardia aestivalis

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native 

Gaillardia aestivalis

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native 

Gaillardia pulchella

Asteraceae

Disk florets and achene

College Station,TX

Native

Gaillardia pulchella

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native

Gaillardia pulchella

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native

Helenium amarum

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native

Helenium amarum

Asteraceae

Head Parts

Wellborn, TX

Native

Heterotheca pilosa 

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native

Liatris squarrosa

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of mature head

Wellborn, TX

Native

Liatris squarrosa

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

Wellborn, TX

Native

Liatris squarrosa

Asteraceae

Head parts

Wellborn, TX

Native

Palafoxia rosea

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

Wellborn, TX

Native

Palafoxia rosea

Asteraceae

Head parts

Wellborn, TX

Native

Ratibida columnifera

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

College Station, TX

Native

Ratibida columnifera

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station, TX

Native

Ratibida columnifera

Asteraceae

Cross section of head

College Station, TX

Native

Ratibida columnifera

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station, TX

Native

Rudbeckia hirta

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

College Station,TX

Native

Rudbeckia hirta

Asteraceae

Head parts

College Station,TX

Native

Verbesina encelioides

Asteraceae

Head parts

Washington on the Brazos

Native

Vernonia baldwinii

Asteraceae

Longitudinal section of head

Washington on the Brazos

Native

Cleistocactus smaragdiflores

Cactaceae

Longitudinal section of flower

 

Cultivated

 Unknown

Cactaceae

Mature fruit

 

Cultivated

Kalanchoe

Crassulaceae

Longitudinal section of flower

 

Cultivated

Kalanchoe

Crassulaceae

Flower dissection

 

Cultivated

Dalea multiflora

Fabaceae

Flower Dissection

Wellborn, TX

Native

Monarda punctata

Lamiaceae

Flower

Wellborn, TX

Native

Cuphea

Lythraceae

Longitudinal section of flower

 

Cultivated

Rhexia mariana

Melastomataceae

Longitudinal section of flower

College Station, TX

Native

Rhexia mariana

Melastomataceae

Longitudinal section of fruit

College Station, TX

Native

Castilleja indivisa

Scrophulariaceae

Flower dissection

Wellborn, TX

Native

Castilleja indivisa

Scrophulariaceae

Flower dissection

Wellborn, TX

Native